Pitch Perfect Call to Action

Big Red Car here on a lovely, sunny Texas Saturday – windy, but lovely.

In the last two weeks, I have spoken to four CEOs who had the same problem – they did not have a reasonable expectation of the “call to action” which they expect from presenting their pitch.

Let’s review, shall we.

A great pitch presents the problem to be solved, the solution, the revenue to be generated from the solution, and the cost to create that solution. No more than ten slides and the slides are the chapter headings for the discussion.

Tell me the slides, Big Red Car

Here they are, dear reader:

1.Title

2.The problem

3.Vision and value proposition

4.The Solution – the secret sauce, the magic

5.Business model

6.Marketing, sales strategy, competition

7.Financials, KPIs

8.Traction, experience to date

9.Team

10.Requested investment, use of funds

You can substitute some, add a couple, revise them, throw a couple overboard, but, generally, that is the story – again, the chapter headings.

You can also add a Business Engine Canvas, which is a particular favorite of mine.

The Business Engine Canvas

You are making this way too hard, CEOs.

First date call to action

After the first contact with funders, the call to action is very simple. You want them to ask questions and be drawn into the magic of your idea.

Remember, you are using the slides as your chapter headings, not as a complete discussion. The chapter headings spark the discussion while the discussion sparks the questions while the questions draw them in deeper and you seduce them.

The call to action on the first date is: QUESTIONS.

It is not the VC or funder reaching for their checkbook. That will take 5-7 “touches.”

I did tell you it would not be speed dating, right?

Bottom line it, Big Red Car

Dear CEO, don’t describe how Switzerland was formed, which villages make watches, how watches are made, the price of watches. Just get the convo started by getting the funder to ask questions.

Does that help?

Remember this – you are not doing missionary work. You are seeking funding. Only about ten percent of your audience will ever get your idea, so resist the temptation to do missionary work and to be irked when someone is not converted.

But, hey, what the Hell do I rally know anyway? I’m just a Big Red Car. Be good to yourself. Questions. That’s all. You got this.